RASHMI BIDASARIA

b. 1993

Rashmi Bidasaria is an Indian designer, who enjoys blurring the boundaries between different material media to find new interpretations that are often inspired by her native roots and cultural understanding. Through her work she aims to bring together all stakeholders - network of designers, researchers, technical experts and the citizens to a common platform.

 

While at the RCA, Rashmi has also co-founded the Design Products Publication - 2MD (Too Many Designers) 

 

Her practice is shaped by her background in architecture and product design and her work extends from spatial experiences to objects and artefacts. Developed around mixed media , her work, brings a multidisciplinary approach to her practice. She likes to engage with people and communities and enjoys the process of uncertainty and discovery with them..

 

Rashmi's work highlights multiple collaboration projects that reflect in the way she conducts her research. Her process is sinusoidal in the way that she learns to make, fail and make again. 

 

At the moment Rashmi is in India and is exploring new ecosystems, material cultures and craft practices around her. As she graduates, Rashmi is working on thoughts about her own practice, collaborating with communities and the impact that they would collectively make happen.

 

Kaarigari Series

Kaarigari , कारीगरी, (Craftsmanship in Hindi) explores the celebration of a craftsman as a front runner in his craft. Hand Block Printing, a 500 year-old traditional craft in India, is now becoming redundant due to advanced digital printing systems and is requiring craft individuals to realise the worth of continuing it. Kaarigari is aimed towards delivering recognition to the artisans towards their work by highlighting their individuality, to feel a sense of pride in this 'mechanical' work that they do. The project records the nuanced signature movements and translates them into patterns that become each artisan's individual signature, an impression of their time, work and body. 

 

The block printing artisans print on an average of 10 hours continuously everyday. Thousands of stamps that print almost as a muscle memory. The monotony and the mundane routine is quite tiresome. Upon working with them and observing them, I realised that each artisan prints very uniquely. There is a notion of performance/dance that is complimented by their movements, their signature move. I began to record those little nuances of movements to translate them into patterns, using analogue techniques like light & motion study and digital tools - Long exposure photography and Virtual Reality.

 

The patterns on the textile illustrate the movement of the artisan on his printing table - specifically finger points of individual artisans. (Pink/Yellow - Left hand, Blue - Right Hand). These dots are representative of their swiftness, skill, dexterity - their signature. 

Mohanlal Kumar - Nov 20st, 2019

Size of fabrics - 270 X 100cm

Mohair Wool, Paper, Rubber, Recycled Plastic, Cotton & Metallic yarn.

Medium - Long exposure Photography, VR, Ultraleap, Unity.

 

Craftspeople involved : Mr.Mohanlal Kumar, Ms.Seema Shah, Mr. Heeralal Kumar, Mr. Vikas Ram, Mr. Gopal Sharma

Yellow dots - Left hand, Red Dots - Right Hand

Collaborator & Sponsor - TextielMuseum | TextielLab (Tilburg, Netherlands)

Heeralal Kumar - November 21st, 2019

Size of fabrics - 270 X 100cm

Mohair Wool, Paper, Rubber, Recycled Plastic, Cotton & Metallic yarn.

Medium - Long exposure Photography, VR, Ultraleap, Unity.

 

Craftspeople involved : Mr.Mohanlal Kumar, Ms.Seema Shah, Mr. Heeralal Kumar, Mr. Vikas Ram, Mr. Gopal Sharma

Yellow dots - Left hand, Red Dots - Right Hand

Collaborator & Sponsor - TextielMuseum | TextielLab (Tilburg, Netherlands)

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