IRINA RAZUMOVSKAYA

b. 1990

Irina’s work is non representational and focuses on the fun potential and limitations of the material. Her ceramic sculptures explore historical architectural influences and the work can sometimes appears as forgotten ruins. This peeling, flaking surface on the ceramic is typical to her work.

 

ARTIST STATEMENT

In her works Irina seeks to avoid direct, narrow, or exact images or symbols, basing her artwork on poly-cultural signs, such as architectural details, everyday and ritual objects. Irina comes to them research on various cultures and always bears in mind their reflection on her own reality, her everyday life. This way every artwork has a personal meaning for the author, but she prefers it to be an ambiguous experience for the viewer, leaving open the possibility of variability in the interpretation of the work. Irina evades tacking any literary plot to her work, letting herself work intuitively using her aesthetic preferences and tacit knowledge of material.

Through her ceramic objects and assemblages Irina creates visions of imagined archaeological artefacts, sites and ruins. Blending together ancient architectural forms, the work reveals itself as a mirage from the distant past, invoking the spirit of long-forgotten ruins.

Irina makes use of unusual textures created through experimental ceramic surface applications, which mimic the effects seen on ageing and crumbling structures. Peeling and decaying surfaces provide glimpses into the deeper layers of meaning that can be found within our shared culture, often obscured by the glossy veneer of the modern world.

The work serves as a critical response to a world where the vandalism of heritage is becoming an everyday occurrence. It reminds us that behind the ephemeral and easy there are profound and abiding connections, which can be uncovered through gaining a deeper understanding of our true context within the history of civilisation.

In her work classicism meets minimalism, giving rise to forms of meditation on the theme the dichotomy between the creative and destructive impulses that animate the entire human history.

 

Candy Mess

Porcelain, stoneware and glazes 

45 x 35 x 4cm

Dimensions exclude frame

Mint Melt

Porcelain, stoneware and glazes 

40 x 30 x 4cm

Painting

Porcelain, stoneware and glazes 

45 x 45 x 6cm

Melt

Porcelain, stoneware and glazes 

50 x 50 x 4cm

Gold

Porcelain, stoneware and glazes 

50 x 30 x 4cm

Blush Melt

Porcelain, stoneware and glazes 

40 x 30 x 4cm

Melt Drop

Porcelain, stoneware and glazes 

40 x 30 x 4cm

Velvet Melt

Porcelain, stoneware and glazes 

50 x 50 x 4cm

Pillar

Porcelain, stoneware and glazes 

90 x 40 x 30cm

Megalith Fog

Porcelain, stoneware and glazes 

45 x 30 x 25cm

Megalith

Table

Porcelain, stoneware and glazes 

70 x 40 x 50cm

Staircase (Turquoise Hue)

Porcelain, stoneware and glazes 

90 x 32 x 18cm

ARCHI (Wall piece)

Porcelain, stoneware and glazes 

55 x 35 x 20cm

Megalith Snow

Porcelain, stoneware and glazes 

45 x 35 x 25cm

Bleed

Porcelain, stoneware, glazes and pigments

75 x 25 x 25cm

Grid

Porcelain, stoneware, glazes and pigments

50 x 50 x 40cm

 

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